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Snowden asks Hong Kong to “decide my fate”

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Photo: Aqua Luna & Cloudy Hong Kong by Kevin Poh

The South China Morning Posts reports today that Edward Snowden said last night that he wants to remain in Hong Kong and let the courts and people there “decide my fate.” This is the first the world has heard from Snowden since he dropped out of sight shortly after disclosing information about NSA surveillance programs that have shocked the world.

Coleen Rowley: Massive spying on Americans is outrageous

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As a Special Agent for the FBI, Coleen Rowley testified before Congress in 2002 about the Bureau’s failure to nab terrorists planning the 9/11 attacks. That year, Time Magazine named her one of three “Persons of the Year.”  Tuesday, in a special report to CNN, Rowley praised Edward Snowden as a “courageous person of conscience,” and criticized the massive surveillance program he uncovered as both inefficient and dangerous.

NSA whistleblower reveals himself as Booz Allen Hamilton employee Edward Snowden

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The Guardian disclosed today the identity of the individual who provided it with information about NSA surveillance. He is Edward Snowden, “a 29-year-old former technical assistant for the CIA and current employee of the defence contractor Booz Allen Hamilton” who “has been working at the National Security Agency for the last four years as an employee of various outside contractors, including Booz Allen and Dell.” The British newspaper says it has revealed Snowden’s identity at his request.

In a videotaped interview with Glenn Greenwald and Ewen MacAskill, Snowden described his motive for disclosing documents revealed by The Guardian over the past two days. It was a matter of conscience, he said, and a realization that “”I don’t want to live in a society that does these sort of things.'”

Glenn Greenwald: NSA has “incredibly invasive system of surveillance worldwide”

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Appearing today on Democracy Now!, Glenn Greenwald spoke about the federal government’s secretive and massive collection of domestic digital communications.  On Thursday, the Guardian published an expose by Greenwald of the NSA’s collection, by court order, of call data for millions of Verizon customers.  The Guardian and the Washington Post followed immediately with exposes of another program called “PRISM.”  That program involved the collection of many more kinds of digital data, including “email, video and voice chat, videos, photos, voice-over-IP (Skype, for example) chats, file transfers, social networking details, and more.”

UK newspaper confirms whistleblowers’ claims of massive NSA surveillance

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Photo: NSA headquarters. By quinnums @Flickr.

Photo: NSA headquarters. By quinnums @Flickr.

A British newspaper, The Guardian, has published evidence supporting the claims of whistleblowers that the National Security Agency tracks domestic phone calls on a massive scale. In a June 5 article,”NSA collecting phone records of millions of Verizon customers daily,” columnist Glenn Greenwald quoted from an April 25  order from a secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance (FISA) Court.