Office of Special Counsel’s mission at risk, GAO reports

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An investigation by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) found serious problems at the Office of Special Counsel (OSC), the federal agency responsible for investigating whistleblower disclosures and retaliation complaints.

Requested by members of Congress for the fiscal years (FY) 2011-2016, the investigation found an increase in complaints to OSC and a backlog that increased from 953 to 1,858. The backlog, GAO notes, “puts OSC’s ability to fulfill its mission of protecting federal employees at risk,” “delays attaining desired favorable actions and remedying wrongdoings,” and may discourage whistleblowers from making disclosures.

“Sister Cathy” murder cold case warms up

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Heroic whistleblower-nun “Sister Cathy” died in valiant effort to stop brutal sexual abuse at her high school, witnesses say

by Tom Nugent

BALTIMORE – More than 47 years after a 26-year-old teaching nun was found murdered in a garbage-littered patch of scrubland on the outskirts of Baltimore, there is convincing new evidence that she died in a tragic bid to blow the whistle on rampant sexual abuse involving both priests and police officers at the nun’s Catholic high school.

The still unsolved killing of Sister Catherine Ann Cesnik – for several years a youthful and high-spirited English teacher at Archbishop Keough High School in southwest Baltimore – still looms as one of Maryland’s most puzzling and enigmatic “cold cases,” according to many law enforcement officials and journalists who have studied the murder over the years.

Nugent tells more in “The Keepers”

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Journalist Tom Nugent, author of our headlined story, “‘Sister Cathy’ murder cold case warms up,” appears as himself in the Netflix documentary series, “The Keepers.” Over seven gripping episodes, the story of murder and alleged child sexual abuse unfolds with Nugent providing narration. The documentary, which some call addictive,  has an impressive 96% favorable rating at the film review website Rotten Tomatoes.

Intelligence veterans praise integrity of journalist Seymour Hersh

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Photo of Seymour Hersh taken September 22, 2017 by Linda Lewis.

Seymour Hersh, 9/22/17. Photo by Linda Lewis.

 

The Sam Adams Associates for Integrity in Intelligence gathered recently in Washington, D.C., to present an award to investigative journalist Seymour (Sy) Hersh.  Hersh revealed in 1969 the massacre of civilians at My Lai (Viet Nam), and exposed torture at Abu Ghraib in 2004. More recently, he challenged the truthfulness of government accounts of an alleged chemical weapons attack in Syria.

Whistleblowers, Moral Injury, and Endless War Was Chelsea Manning Motivated By Moral Injury?

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By Peter Van Buren

“My guilt will never go away,” former Marine Matthew Hoh explained to me. “There is a significant portion of me that doesn’t believe it should be allowed to go away, that this pain is fair.”

If America accepts the idea of fighting endless wars, it will have to accept something else as well: that the costs of war are similarly endless. I’m thinking about the trillions of dollars, the million or more “enemy” dead (a striking percentage of them civilians), the tens of thousands of American combat casualties, those 20 veteran suicides each day, and the diminished lives of those who survive all of that. There’s that pain, carried by an unknown number of women and men, that won’t disappear, ever, and that goes by the label “moral injury.”

Regulator ignored 700 Wells Fargo whistleblower complaints

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History shows that federal agencies are prone to be dismissive of whistleblower complaints. Nevertheless, it’s shocking to read that the Comptroller of the Currency, the federal banking regulator, failed to investigate 700 whistleblower complaints about fraudulent Wells Fargo practices, an internal review disclosed.